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All Stories: 39

This no-nonsense iron-front warehouse with large windows and minimal decoration was converted into residential lofts by the 1980s. Its iron elements were cast by the big Cornell iron foundry located alongside the Hudson River at West 26th Street. The…

Circular glass lenses, through which natural light can pass to illumine the basement, are embedded in cast iron sidewalk panels and stairs in front of a large Romanesque Revival masonry building. This is likely the largest surviving vault light…

Once a standard light fixture on city streets, only a few cast iron lampposts still exist in SoHo. (Another light stands at 542 Broadway.) After 1903 this “Shepherd’s Crook” design became a standard feature throughout the city when several…

The original folding iron shutters—offering both security and fire protection—still cover the lower level of these three buildings on Mercer Street, which share a common Broadway facade. The once functional iron screens, cast by G. R. Jackson and…

The twelve iron columns along Mercer Street, at the back of this substantial brick-and-stone building facing Broadway, brilliantly demonstrate how the metal can be fluidly shaped into decorative forms. Swirling bands of iron twist around the smooth…

In the era of gas lighting, cast iron was often used for large window enframements that opened up the interior to light and air. This ornate brick building of the 1880s, with continuous glazed areas along its Broadway front, reflects this practice.…

The graceful L-shaped skyscraper at 561 Broadway, with its exquisite exterior ironwork and extensive terra cotta decoration, was built as a factory by the Singer Manufacturing Company for the production of sewing machines. It is often called the…

Charles “Broadway” Rouss’s exuberant spirit is reflected in this ten-story building, the tallest structure using cast iron in SoHo. Rouss, who came north after the Civil War, placed a sign at the construction site in 1889 reading: “He who…

This was the last iron front erected in the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District. The spare use of the metal supporting the glass facade shows a more sophisticated appreciation of the qualities of iron than is seen in the iron front of the beloved…

Corrosion (rust), the most common enemy of cast iron, is apparent on some buildings in SoHo where the paint coating has not been maintained, or has been removed and the cast iron left exposed for “aesthetic” reasons. For the maintenance of cast…

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